Category Archives: Everyday Baking

Double Apple Bundt Cake

Have I told you how I got myself in joining the Tuesdays with Dorie baking group in February, 2012?

I have a holiday tradition. I choose a new cookbook at the beginning of each year and I explore it slowly as the year unfolds. In 2011 that was Around My French Table by Dorie Greenspan. At the beginning of 2012, still without a new cookbook, I was browsing through Dorie’s blog. I remember reading that a new baking adventure is about to begin.

That was it! I was in. I ordered the book and was able to join the group one week later.

Today is Dorie’s birthday. In honor of her birthday and all the yumminess she has brought to our home, I baked a cake. Happy Birthday, Dorie!

With the University of British Columbia Botanical Garden Apple Festival happening last weekend, it was easy to pick a seasonal recipe. How does Double Apple Bundt Cake sound? The recipe is from Baking: From My Home to Yours.

double apple bundt cake

The cake batter in addition to freshly grated apples and traditional fall spices, calls for apple butter. British Columbia’s Gala, Granny Smith, and Ambrosia apples cooked slowly in my crockpot until they transformed themselves into apple butter.

red apples

I do not use any liquid, sugar, or spices when making apple butter nor peel the apples. Once the apples are thoroughly cooked, I blend them and cook a bit more.

Off we go to the Apple Festival!

apple pieThere was apple pie, of course. But look at that pie cutting tool. Very cool!

sliced apple pie

Even the tablecloths had apples.

apple stand

Hot drinks and candied apples stand

salish tasting

Apple tastings of one of the really delicious BC apples – Salish.

bagged apples

We bought a bunch of Salish apples. We love Salish apples!

northern spy

And this is the coolest apple name e-v-e-r!

When we got back from the festival, we enjoyed slices of Double Apple Bundt Cake and warm apple cider. There is no such thing as apple overload!

apple bundt slice

I increased the amount of cinnamon in the cake recipe and soaked the raisins in Jamaican rum. The cake was delicious, moist and with so many layering aromas. We loved it!

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Polvorónes con Cajeta de Leche

Today is a double holiday!

We are celebrating Cinco de Mayo and my name day. I guess it is not such a rare coincidence that I have been named after the Goddess of Peace and one of my favorite towns in Mexico is called La Paz.

In La Paz, in the local panaderia Karla, I tasted polvorónes for a first time and I loved them. Polvorónes are crumbly shortbread cookies enriched with finely ground nuts and dusted with powdered sugar. Polvo is the Spanish word for dust.

Because of the double holiday, I decided to make double cookies with cajeta de leche filling. For the polvorónes, I used the dough from the Hungarian Shortbread recipe with added almonds and vanilla.

Cajeta de Leche is the Mexican version of Dulce de Leche. It is a thick caramel sauce made out of milk and sugar. When alcohol, such as dry sherry, madeira, or dry white wine to name a few, is added to the cajeta, it is called cajeta envinada. Dried fruits and nuts could also boost the richness of the cajeta.

This recipe is for Cajeta de Leche Envinada Especial and it has the goodness of caramel, almonds, and marsala wine. It could be eaten with a spoon straight out of the jar or to make any type of sandwich cookies, as a topping for ice cream and crepes, as a layer in millionaire shortbread bars, Banofi pie, brownies…

¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!

Cajeta de Leche Envinada Especial

Adapted from The Essential Cuisines of Mexico by Diana Kennedy

Ingredients

6 cups (1.5 L) milk
2 cups (400 gr) granulated sugar
1/8 tsp baking soda
3 egg yolks from large eggs
1/3 cup (70 g) almonds, blanched and finely ground
½ cup (125 mL) marsala wine

Directions

  1. Put the milk, sugar and baking soda in a large saucepan and place over medium heat.
  2. Bring the milk and sugar mixture to a boil and when the milk starts to foam up, stir the mixture with a wooden spoon. Continue to cook the milk, stirring frequently, for 30 min.
  3. Put ¾ cup of the milk and sugar mixture aside and cool to room temperature.
  4. Beat the egg yolks until creamy and add them to the cooled ¾ cup of the milk-sugar mixture.
  5. Continue boiling the rest of the milk mixture until it becomes thick, sticky and caramel colored. As it thickens, stir the mixture continuously or it will stick to the pan. This should take around 30 – 60 minutes. You might need to adjust the temperature – the milk should be at a low rolling boil at all times. The longer you cook the milk, the darker it gets.
  6. Remove the milk and sugar mixture from the heat and add the egg mixture to the thickened milk, stirring all the time. Continue cooking the mixture over medium heat until it starts to come away from the sides and bottom of the pan. Remove from the heat.
  7. Stir in the almonds and marsala wine into the mixture. Let the cajeta cool before storing in the fridge in screw-top jars. It will keep indefinitely or depending on how often you open the jar and indulge.

Polvorónes

  1. Prepare the dough using the same ingredients and technique as in the Hungarian Shortbread recipe. Add 1 cup of blanched and finely ground almonds and 2 teaspoons pure vanilla to the dough.
  2. Chill the dough in the fridge for 2 hours and roll it out to a ¼ inch thickness.
  3. Using a cookie cutter, cut out cookies of desired shapes and sizes. Work as quickly as you can, because the dough warms um very quickly.
  4. Transfer the cookies to a cookie sheet and refrigerate until firm to the touch, 30 min or so.
  5. Preheat the oven to 350F (180C) and position the rack in the middle. Bake the cookies for 12-15 min or until the cookies are golden in color.
  6. After the cookies cool, spread one cookie with the cajeta, place another cookie on top and dust with icing sugar.

Grappa, Raisins, and Pine Nut Torte

Call me crazy but I decided to open the vintage bottle of grappa that we had sitting at home when I read the recipe for Grappa, Currant, and Pine Nut Torte by Alice Medrich. It is the bottle that we open for special holidays and we will have just a shot…

Yes, this weekend it was time to celebrate with Lindy Bout VI! No, we did not compete but we had so much fun!

In it’s original version by Alice Medrich, this torte is made with semolina flour, currants, and cream of tartar. Since I almost never buy these ingredients, I ended up making some minor substitutions but keeping the star ingredient – grappa!

Traditionally, grappa is made from the leftover by-product from winemaking, also known as pomace.  After it is mixed with sugar and left to ferment for a while, the brandy is distilled. Italian, Spanish, French, Portuguese, and Balkan brandy makers are famous for their own variations of grappa. It is being enjoyed as both an aperitif and as a digestive. The flavor is hugely dependent on the type and quality of the grapes being used, the distillation and aging processes.

Grappa and chocolate? Yes, please!

Grappa, Raisins, and Pine Nut Torte

Adapted from Bittersweet by Alice Medrich

Ingredients

¼ cup (60 mL) grappa
1/3 cup (50 g) raisins
¼ cup (50 g) almonds, finely ground
¼ (30 g) cup all-purpose flour
9 oz bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped
1 ¾ (200 g) sticks butter, cut into small pieces
6 large eggs, separated
1 cup (200 g) sugar
1/8 tsp salt
¼ tsp (1.25 mL) lemon juice
3 tablespoons (15 g) pine nuts

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 375F (190C) and position the rack in the lower third. Line with parchment paper a 9 inch springform pan.
  2. Mix the raisins with the grappa.
  3. Mix the all-purpose flour with the ground almonds.
  4. Place the chocolate and butter in a heatproof bowl over a pan of gently simmering water, making sure that the water does not touch the bowl. Stir the chocolate from time to time, until it is almost melted. Remove from the heat and stir the chocolate until melted.
  5. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the egg yolks, 2/3 cup of the sugar, and salt until the mixture is pale and thick. Add the melted chocolate, raisins, and grappa.
  6. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the egg whites and lemon juice on medium speed until white and foamy. Gradually add the remaining 1/3 cup of sugar, beating on high speed until the egg whites are almost stiff.
  7. Add 1/3 of the egg whites, all-purpose flour, and ground almonds into the chocolate mixture and fold gently.
  8. Add the remaining egg whites and spoon batter into the prepared springform pan.
  9. Sprinkle the top generously with pine nuts.
  10. Bake until a tester inserted into center of the cake comes out clean, about 20 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and cool completely before slicing.

Tahini Cookies for Earth Day

My fingers are sticky and I keep licking them. Hummus – check, baba ghannouj – check, tahini salad dressing- check, tahini pasta sauce – check.

There is still tahini in the jar…The tahini is made by my parents’ best friends from university. It has traveled the world to get into my pantry.

What else to make? Suddenly I hear Cabra Casey sing Ane Nahatka from the Toure-Raichel Collective: The Tel Aviv Session and it hits me! Israeli tahini cookies!

Benny Saida is the man behind this recipe. He is a well-respected Israeli cookbook author known for his easy, delicious, and very Israeli recipes.

For sesame lovers, these are the bomb! The cookies are subtly sweet, nutty, and buttery. Happy Earth Day!

Tahini Cookies – עוגיות טחינה

Ingredients

3 cups (450 g) all-purpose flour
1 cup (200 g) tahini paste
1 cup (200 g) granulated sugar
200 gr butter, at room temperature
2 teaspoons (10 g) baking powder
2 teaspoons (10 mL) pure vanilla
2 – 4 tablespoons cold water, if needed
sesame seeds, blanched almonds, walnuts for sprinkling the cookies

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 325F and position the rack in the middle. Line the bottom of a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour and baking powder.
  3. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat sugar and butter on medium speed until creamy. Mix in tahini, until well combined. Add vanilla.
  4. Gradually add the flour and mix on very low speed, until the flour is just combined.
  5. If the dough will not hold together, add 1 tablespoon of cold water at a time.
  6. Roll dough into 1 1/2- inch balls; place 2 inches apart on baking sheets.
  7. Lightly flatten each ball. Sprinkle the top of the cookies with nuts or sesame seeds.
  8. Bake until the surfaces crack slightly, 14 to 15 minutes. Let cool slightly; transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

Note: Vanilla was not an ingredient in the original recipe.

Easter Bread

My yearly Easter anxiety is finally over… Yeah! It rose, it baked beautifully and is delish!

I guess my desire to try new recipes and to self-improve my cooking skills stems from a few sleepless before-Easter nights. Or is it Firefox’ New Tab feature?!

I read, I imagined, I felt like a cartoon character with a constant bubble above her head that read: “Easter Bread?” Should it be French Brioche or Italian Panettone, Russian Kulich, Greek Tsoureki, Bulgarian Kouzunak, English Hot Cross Buns, Belgian Cramique or …? It wasn’t a dilemma, it was my yearly Easter-emma!

The night before the big day, I decided I am sticking to my grandma’s traditional recipe and using a new braiding technique. I ended up playing with fresh yeast for the first time ever and adding orange zest and orange juice to the dough. I also slightly deviated from the traditional raisins and almonds filling and I used dark chocolate chips and walnuts with cinnamon sugar.

Lila Downs with her Pecados y Milagros album helped tremendously for the final results!

Христос Воскресе!

Easter Bread

Ingredients

Sponge

25 gr fresh yeast or 4 teaspoons active dry yeast
1 tablespoon flour
2 tablespoons milk
1 teaspoon sugar
¼ teaspoon salt

Mix all sponge ingredients together and set the sponge uncovered and undisturbed for 30-40 minutes in a warm place. Once the yeast is activated, the sponge will be bubbly and double or more in size.

Dough

300gr granulated sugar
6 eggs
250ml milk, at room temperature
2 teaspoons pure vanilla
1 tablespoon dark rum
Grated zest and juice of one large lemon
Grated zest and juice of one medium-sized orange
1 kg all-purpose flour
250 gr butter, melted and cooled
1 egg yolk, for egg wash
Sanding sugar, for sprinkling

Filling Ideas

* Make your picks and improvise to your liking

  • Raisins soaked overnight in dark rum
  • Almonds/walnuts, sugar, cinnamon
  • Chocolate chips
  • Thick jam
  • Cinnamon sugar

Directions

  1. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat in sugar and eggs on medium speed, until well combined. Add milk.
  2. Add vanilla, rum, grated lemon and orange zests, lemon and orange juice.
  3. Add in the sponge.
  4. Sift the flour.
  5. Attach the dough hook and reduce the mixer speed to low and start adding slowly ½ cup of flour at a time until all the flour is incorporated. Stop to scrape down the hook and bowl as needed. Continue mixing until you have a cohesive dough. Your mixer will become hot so make sure that you allow the time for your mixer to cool.
  6. Add the butter a few tablespoons at a time until you have a soft and smooth dough. *I usually start adding the butter with the help of the mixer. Then I will butter my hands and knead the dough incorporating the butter that way.
  7. Transfer the dough to a very large buttered bowl, cover with a cotton towel (the dough needs to breath) and let rise in a warm place, undisturbed until the dough has doubled in bulk, usually 1 to 2 hours.
  8. Deflate the dough and divide into 4 equal pieces.
  9. With buttered hands, shape each piece into a rectangle that is 20 inches long, 5 inches wide, and ¼ inch thick. Spread your filling and roll up each rectangle jelly-roll fashion.
  10. Braid your bread.
  11. Generously butter your pan and place the braided bread in the pan. I use a 6 qt dutch oven. Cover with a cotton towel (the bread needs to breath) and let rise in a warm place, undisturbed until the bread has reached the middle of the pan, usually 1 hour.
  12. Preheat the oven to 350F and position the rack in the middle.
  13. Paint the bread with the egg yolk and sprinkle generously with the sanding sugar.
  14. Bake until a tester inserted into center of the bread comes out clean, about 40 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and cool for 15 minutes. Unmold the bread from pan and cool completely before slicing.
  15. Store wrapped in cotton towel and placed in a plastic bag.

 

 

Easter Cookies

In the week before Easter my grandmother would make cookies. She had four cookie cutters that I vividly remember – a four-leaf clover, a heart, a flower, and a fancy looking square.

Once the cookies would come out of the oven, I will start tasting one cookie after the other and arguing with my dear grandmother that I am trying to figure out if all shapes taste the same. And she pretended she believed me! Soon after, the cookies would be packed in bags and stored away from the eyes of the lurking cookie monsters.

They will reappear again on Easter morning.

Listening to Maria Callas sing the aria of Violetta from La Traviata, I made little flowers to celebrate the flowers in my life.

Easter Cookies

Ingredients

2 large eggs and 1 egg yolk, at room temperature
1 cup (200 g) sugar
1/3 cup (80 mL) yogurt
10 g bakers ammonia
½ (2 mL) teaspoon baking soda
1 1/2 sticks (170 g) butter, melted and cooled to room temperature
Grated zest of 1 large lemon
1 teaspoon (5 mL) pure vanilla
3 ½ cups (500 g) all-purpose flour
sanding sugar for sprinkling the cookies

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350F and position the rack in the middle. Line the bottom of a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the two eggs and sugar until smooth.
  3. Dissolve bakers ammonia and baking soda in the yogurt and add to the eggs and sugar.
  4. Fold in the melted butter. Add vanilla and the grated zest.
  5. Gradually add the flour until a soft dough is formed.
  6. Roll the dough to ¼ inch thickness and cut desired cookie shapes.
  7. Brush the top of the cookies with egg wash and sprinkle with sanding sugar.
  8. Bake for 8 – 10 minutes and transfer the cookies to a cooling rack.

Note: Don’t freak because of the ammonia smell that you might feel coming out of the hot oven! You will not taste it at all in the cookies. This is what makes the cookies light and crispy and cannot be duplicated with the use of another leavener.

It is totally worth it finding bakers ammonia for this recipe.

Black Olives and Cheese Bread

You do not hand the salt from one person to the other or you will start a fight. To become best friends with someone, you have to eat a bag of salt together. Guests are welcomed with bread and salt. If you are left without salt in your house, you will become poor. And the list goes on…

I had a salty superstitious feeling. I wanted to feel the salt on my tongue again…You know, as much as:

“How much do you love me?

“As much as salt.”

How do you delight your palate with saltiness? For me this time, the answer was dried pears, leeks, olives, and spicy cheese in a simple, dense loaf of bread.

Black Olives and Cheese Bread

Adapted from Around My French Table by Dorie Greenspan

Ingredients

1 cup (130 g) whole wheat flour
¾ (100 g) cup all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon (15 mL) baking powder
1 tsp (5 mL) salt
¼ tsp (5 mL) black pepper
3 large eggs
2/3 cup (160 mL) buttermilk
1/3 cup (80 mL) grapeseed oil + 1 tablespoon
½ cup (90 g) grated spiced Provolone cheese
½ cup (90 g) grated Gruyere
1 tablespoon (15 mL) fresh thyme
1 tablespoon (15 mL) dried savory
1/3 cup (70 g) toasted walnuts, chopped
½ cup (70 g) kalamata olives, chopped
1 cup dried pears (110 g), rehydrated and chopped
3 leeks, white and light green parts only, thinly sliced

Directions

  1. Heat one tablespoon of grapeseed oil over medium heat. Add the leeks and cook for about 10 minutes, until they are soft and fragrant.
  2. Heat a dry skillet over medium heat and add the walnuts. Toast the walnuts for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently until the walnuts smell toasty. Remove from pan, cool and roughly chop.
  3. Preheat the oven to 350 F and position the rack in the middle. Generously butter and flour a 9-inch glass loaf pan.
  4. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flours, baking powder, salt, and black pepper. Sift the dry ingredients.
  5. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat in eggs one at a time, until well combined. Add buttermilk and grapeseed oil.
  6. Add the dry ingredients and beat on low speed until well combined.
  7. Stir in the grated cheeses, herbs, toasted walnuts, olives, dried pears, and cooked leeks. The dough will be dense and heavy.
  8. Spoon batter into the prepared loaf pan and smooth with a spatula.
  9. Bake until a tester inserted into center of the bread comes out clean, about 40 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and cool for 15 minutes. Unmold the bread from pan and cool completely before slicing.

Nan-e Nokhochi

My grandmother always celebrated the first day of Spring. It was a special holiday for her.

Little did I know that her special day was called Nowruz and celebrated big by Persians around the world as the beginning of the new year. My neighbourhood Iranian bakery makes these cookies year round, however they are typically served during Nowruz.

I baked them with love to celebrate the life of my grandmother!

Nan-e Nokhochi
Shortbread cookies with a twist!
Adapted from Epicurious

Ingredients

1 ½ sticks of butter (170 gr), clarified
1 cup (150 gr) icing sugar
3 teaspoons (15 ml) cardamom
1 teaspoon (5 ml) pure vanilla
3 cups chickpea flour (aka as gram flour and garbanzo flour and besan) (360 gr), roasted and sifted
1 egg (optional)
ground pistachios

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 300F and position the rack in the middle.
  2. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat icing sugar and butter on medium speed until creamy. Mix in egg, until well combined. Add cardamom and vanilla.
  3. Add chickpea flour and mix on very low speed. It is recommended to knead the dough by hand until it holds together.
  4. Shape the dough into a ¾ inch high circle and refrigerate for an hour.
  5. Remove the dough from the refrigerator and cut it with a cookie cutter. Sprinkle each cookie with ground pistachios.
  6. Place the cookies on a baking sheet covered with parchment and bake in the oven for 20 minutes.
  7. Cool the cookies completely.

Note: Traditionally, the cookie dough is cut with four-leafed clover cutters.

You could either use ghee, that is available in Indian and Middle Eastern stores, or make your own clarified butter. In order to use 1 ½ sticks of clarified butter, you would need to use a bit more than 2 sticks of butter.

Roasting of the chickpea flour minimizes its beany aroma. Roast it in a heavy skillet over medium heat, until it changes color to light medium brown. Make sure that you stir it continuously to prevent it from burning. Do the flour roasting in a couple of batches so you do not overcrowd the pan and get splashed with flour when stirring it.

Chocolate Chestnut Pound Cake

Do you have a favorite mixing spoon or a jinxed baking pan?

I admit I have both. No matter what I bake, I have to mix with my favorite wooden spoon. The jinxed baking pan is a completely different story. It is that cute and tiny Bundt cake pan that is begging to be put in the oven. Once out of the oven, it starts misbehaving and creating chaos! This is what happened with this chocolate chestnut pound cake – I had a flopped cake and crumbs all over the kitchen counter and kitchen floor. Arghhhhh! After a cool down period, I resorted to my not so cute and tiny but trusted spring pan. Maybe, I am finally due for a new Bundt pan!

In the first cookbook written by an American in 1796, Amelia Simmons uses one-pound amounts of sugar, flour, butter, and eggs for her pound cake. Although this recipe deviates from the traditional pound cake recipe, it still makes a rich and decadent cake. The sweet and nutty chestnut flour flavor is complemented by the earthy hazelnuts and pure chocolate.

This is a delicious and happy melt-in-your mouth cake! Of course, we ate the flopped cake too!

Wondering where to buy chestnut flour? Try Italian specialty food stores, health-food stores, or online retailers. I ended up buying dried roasted chestnuts that I milled to powder in a high-speed blender.

Chocolate Chestnut Pound Cake
Adapted from Pure Dessert by Alice Medrich

Ingredients

1 cup (130 g) all-purpose flour
1 cup (130 g) whole wheat flour
1 cup (130 g) chestnut flour
1 tablespoon (15 mL) unsweetened cocoa powder
½ (2 mL) teaspoon baking powder
½ (2 mL) teaspoon baking soda
½ (2 mL) teaspoon salt
2 sticks (225 g) butter, at room temperature
2 cups (400 g) sugar
1 teaspoon (5 mL) pure vanilla
4 large eggs, at room temperature
2/3 cup (160 mL) buttermilk
1/3 cup (80 mL) dark rum or cognac
4 oz (120 g) unsweetened chocolate, melted
7 oz (200 g) coarsely chopped roasted hazelnuts

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 325F and position the rack in the middle. Generously butter and flour a 12 cup Bundt pan.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flours, cocoa powder, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Sift the dry ingredients.
  3. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat sugar and butter on medium speed until creamy. Mix in eggs one at a time, until well combined. Add vanilla.
  4. Add 1/3 of the dry ingredients and beat on low speed until well combined. Add ½ of the buttermilk and ½ of the rum and mix until the liquid is absorbed. Repeat with the remaining 1/3 of the dry ingredients and all the remaining buttermilk and rum and mix until the liquid is absorbed. Add the remaining 1/3 of the dry ingredients and mix until combined.
  5. Finally, add the melted chocolate and roughly chopped roasted hazelnuts.
  6. Spoon batter into the prepared Bundt pan and smooth with a spatula.
  7. Bake until a tester inserted into center of the cake comes out clean, about 40 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and cool for 15 minutes. Unmold cake from pan and cool completely before slicing.

Note: To roast the hazelnuts, preheat the oven to 350F and position the rack in the middle. Roast the hazelnuts on a baking sheet until fragrant, around 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and wrap the hazelnuts in a towel for 5 minutes. With the palm of your hand, rub the towel back and forth to skin the hazelnuts. Let cool and chop roughly.

To melt the chocolate, chop it roughly and put it in a heatproof bowl over a pan of gently simmering water, making sure that the water does not touch the bowl. Stir the chocolate from time to time, until it is completely melted. Remove from the heat and let cool slightly.

Apricot Levkar Oat Bars

Matrimonial cake, anyone? No matter how these dates and oats sandwich cookies are called, they are low maintenance and major yum! The original recipe got shockingly twisted in the oven chaos kitchen because of the enormous amounts of apricot levkar and cinnamon sugar that I had left from making rugelach. The final results are apricot levkar oat bars that are good to the last matrimonial crumb!

Apricot Levkar Oat Bars

Ingredients

¾ cup all-purpose flour
¼ cup whole wheat flour
1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats
3/4 cup packed dark-brown sugar
1/4 cup white sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 tablespoon cinnamon
½ teaspoon nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
1 ½ sticks unsalted butter, cold, cut into small pieces
1 ½ cups apricot levkar

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line an 8-by-8-by-2-inch baking pan with aluminum foil, making sure that the foil sticks an inch above the rim of the pan. Butter the bottom and the sides of the foil.
  2. In a bowl, combine flour, oats, sugar, baking powder, and spices. Add butter, and blend with your fingertips (or you could use your food processor and pulse the mixture) until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs.
  3. Transfer half of the crumb mixture into the pan and press it into the bottom. Spread the apricot levkar over the bottom layer of the crumb mixture. Cover with remaining crumb mixture.
  4. Bake until golden brown, about 40 minutes. Transfer pan to a wire rack to cool completely.
  5. Cut into squares as big as you heart desires and enjoy!
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